Fair isle tutorial

One person who read  a recent post asked if I could add a video tutorial.

Now I don’t do video tutorials and in fact, for myself, I normally prefer pictures and diagrams that I can peruse at my leisure, so I am going to share a few photographs that I hope explains exactly what I was suggesting.

The post in question was on knitting fair isle and how I had now mastered a way of ensuring that the yarns didn’t get tangled and could even be twisted every other stitch if wanted. I give a description of this in an Addendum to the post but maybe a picture is worth a thousand words, as they say, so here is an explanation with photographs.

I don’t describe what to do for purl stitches because it is essentially the same principle and when learning fair isle it is better to use circular knitting where all the stitches will be knit. However a piece of flat knitting is easier to photograph.

Knitting Fair Isle

The first thing is to separate the two yarns one on either side. The one on the right being the ‘upper’ (normally background) yarn and the one on the left being the ‘lower’ yarn.

As in this photograph.I am referring to the person’s own right and left.

Arranging the yarns like this naturally makes the one on the right hand side higher than the other and helps in remembering which is which.

This method will work whether you are twisting frequently or only every few stitches. However it always involves two adjacent stitches of the same colour.

When twisting frequently and knitting an odd number of stitches in the same colour,  I will always knit the first one normally and then twist the yarn for the next two. (Repeating the twisting for more pairs as necessary.)

Firstly I will deal with twisting the yarn for stitches using the ‘upper’ right-hand side yarn.

I think you can see in the photograph how the green (right-hand) yarn naturally sits above the pink (left-hand) yarn.

For the first of the two stitches, I pull a loop of the upper yarn forwards under the lower yarn and use that to wind round the needle. (See arrow)First stitch with upper yarnFor the next stitch, I pull the yarn back and use that to knit the stitch. (See arrow)Second stitch with upper yarnI think you can see that this will bring the green yarn back to the top.

The yarn should now be untwisted in any way and back to where you started.

Now knitting with the ‘lower’ left-hand side yarn.

This time I pull a loop backwards under the ‘upper’ yarn and knit with this. (See arrow) First stitch with lower yarnLooking at the photograph below I think you can see how the pink yarn is now naturally above the green.

So I pull the yarn forward and use the length that is below to make the stitch. (See arrow)Second stitch with lower yarnAs before, the yarn should now be untwisted in any way and back to where you started.

Everyone has their own way of holding yarn but I find it is possible to hold both in the right hand and use the first finger and thumb to twist from one to the other. Though a certain amount of letting go is also needed.

I hope that all this is helpful and adds to what I said before.

(As a footnote. When working purl stitches I did tend to find that I needed to treat the right hand yarn as the lower and the left hand yarn as the upper.)

African Violet tutorial

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Patterns now available as a pdf – African Violets

If you use this tutorial any feedback would be gratefully received. If you had a photograph I would include it in a future post.

Here is how I made my African Violets. The great thing about this is that we don’t need to be perfect. We are trying to copy nature and nature is never perfect.

When I follow someone else’s pattern I often adapt it to my preferred way of working, so feel free to adapt this to suit yourself and the sort of African violet display you wish to create.

The first thing to do is to find a suitable thing to use as a plant pot.

For this tutorial I am using a 3.5″ – 9cm plastic plant pot but you could also cut down a 500g yogurt pot and decorate it, as it is a similar size. Otherwise you could use a pot or similar container of any suitable size.

You will need to fill the pot with scrunched up kitchen paper or similar with a flatish top as I did in my other pots.

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I am going to start by describing making the brown circle that the leaves and flowers are attached to. Very little of this will be visible so no special care needs to be taken in its making.

I start with a magic loop and not to overload the tutorial, I have written a Magic Loop tutorial that takes you through the process of working the first dc (US – sc) for those who might be interested. – You can find the LINK HERE.

I am using UK terms throughout.

FOR THOSE WHO LIKE SUCH THINGS – There are charts for the leaves and flower and short patterns right at the end. AND there is a US version of the short patterns at the very end.

I think that once you get into it you should be able to make the whole project in no more than four to six hours.

Making the brown circle

I now have an improved pattern for working a ‘perfect circle’ – https://rainbowjunkiecorner.wordpress.com/2016/04/18/how-to-crochet-a-perfect-circle/

In this post I worked the circle with a 4.5mm hook, a 3.5mm hook at my sort of tension was a bit small though a 4mm hook was okay. Working an extra row was too much even with the 3.5 hook so I would suggest eight rows with a 4mm hook for most people or a 4.5mm if you crochet a bit tight like me.

Use the above for the increases in each round and you will get a circle not an octagon!

Tutorial valid from HERE

This is worked with dark brown DK yarn and a 4mm hook.

Work 8 dcs into a magic loop.

8browndc

Then pull the loop tight and working in a spiral and starting in the first dc.

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Work 2dcs into each of the first eight dcs.

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Note the eight holes. This will be important later.

To HERE – I may redo the rest at some point!

Continuing in a spiral and working into every dc, increase eight times in every round .

Next round: Working into each dc – work  2dc into first dc then 1dc – repeat eight times

Following round: Work 2dc into first dc then 1dc, 1dc, – repeat eight times

Can you see a pattern here?

You can either count or if you prefer to look you will see that the increases are always into the first of the two increase dcs on the previous round.

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What you create is more of an octagon than a circle and the increases are at the points.

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Continue until the circle fits neatly into the pot. It doesn’t matter if it is not quite flat but it needs to fit on top of the paper (or other filler) near the top of the pot.

[My last round was (2dc, 1dc,1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc) x 8.]

Finish off the loose ends.

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Next: let’s make the leaves. We make four each in three sizes.

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Use dark green DK yarn and different size hooks as indicated. Leave good long tails for sewing in.

Small Leaf

This is worked with a 3.5mm hook and mine came out about 1.5″ without the stem.

You want to make the sort of slip knot that will close easily if you pull the tail. [Tail here extra short so you can recognise it.]

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Start by making 7ch and work 1tr into the back loop only of 3rd ch from the hook and another similarly in the next chain

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Then a dtr into the following two chs.

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You will now be back to the first loop.

We will work three stitches into this. Two before the knot – a dtr and trtr.

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and one after – a dtr.

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Then work back along the chain working into the other side of the loops in reverse. (dtr, dtr, tr, tr). Finish with 2ch then insert hook behind 2ch opposite

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and make a slp stitch into the loop.

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Complete by working 4ch to make a stem.

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Leave a long tail

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Pull the slip knot tight and sew in the yarn up the back of the leaf so it does not show at the front.

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and then down again.

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This gives a good spine to the leaf.

The leaf may need to be pulled into shape but it is meant to be curved.

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Make three more.

Medium leaf

This is worked with a 4mm hook. (Mine was about 1.7″ without the stem.)

It is worked in the same way as above, except that five stitches are worked into the loop at the start of the yarn instead of three.

These are dtr, dtr, trtr before the knot and dtr, dtr after.

0267-mediumleafchange

At the end there are five chain for a stem.

Make four of these

Large leaf

This is exactly the same as the medium leaf but worked with a 4.5mm hook. (About 1.9″)

Make four.

Now the flowers. We will join them all together at the end.

I made six flowers.

Flowers

For the tutorial I made these with a 4mm hook because I couldn’t remember what I had used originally.

I think that I probably made the first, dark purple ones, with a 3.5mm hook and this makes them easier to space out. However African Violet flowers come in a variety of colours and sizes so choose what you prefer – experiment!

I made the original flowers in three different colours.

0265-threeflowers

For the tutorial I chose to use the lighter violet as I thought it would be easier to see the stitches.

So choose your preferred colour in a DK yarn and preferred hook size and get started.

There are only two rounds.

They also use the Magic Loop but you work 10dcs for the first round.

For the second round you work 1dc into the first dc at the start0267-startpetals

and then 3ch

0267-3chain

a 2tr cluster into the next dc.

Here is how to work the 2tr cluster for those who would like some pictures.

0267-2trcluster

1) Yarn round hook insert in stitch. 2) Loop pulled through. 3) Yarn pulled through two loops – two loops on hook, yarn round hook ready for next part.

4) Insert hook in same stitch and pull through loop (4 loops on hook). 5) Pull yarn through two loops. 6) Pull yarn through remaining three loops.

After another 3ch and 1dc into next stitch this gives the first petal.

0267-petalmade

You alternate between 1dc and (3ch, 2tr cluster into next dc, 3ch) all round the circle, ending with a slip stitch into the start.

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Leave a good long tail. You have a flower with five petals. Turn it over.

Sew the tail into the back of the flower0267-movetail

so it comes out opposite the starting tail.

0267-backoflower

Pull the starting tail to close the circle up as much as you can.

0267-frontoflower

Make five more flowers or as many as you want.

Now we make the yellow centre for the flowers. The picture below will enlarge in case you need a closer look.

I used yellow #10 crochet cotton for these but you could use DK yarn if you split it and use just one strand or maybe split a DK strand of cotton yarn rather than buy a whole ball you don’t need for anything else.

I start with 5ch. Two to hold onto and three for a picot.

Insert your hook into the third chain from the hook (as in first picture below) and make a slip stitch – One picot. Another three chain and slip stich into third chain from hook as before;  repeat twice more. Four picots. (Second picture.)0267-makingcentre

Finish off the yarn leaving a long tail and thread the tail through the chain just before the first picot. (Third picture.)

Then thread the same end through the midle of the four picots from below. (Fourth picture.)

Finish off by threading back through the chain next to the picots (no picture) and pull tight. One centre made.

0267-flowercentre

Now pull the ends through the centre of the flower

0267-pullcentrethrough

and sew firmly in place with three little stitches at the back and trim ends of yellow cotton or yarn. They won’t be seen.

0267-centreendssewn

Here is how the flower looks with crochet cotton centre and one strand acrylic yarn centre.

0267-comparecentres

Make the same number of centres as flowers and sew in place.

Now we are ready to put it all together

Remember those eight hole I showed you at the beginning? Well you want to thread the stems of the four large and four medium leaves through these.

I used this picture to decide how to choose which size leaf to put in each hole.

0265-picture

Although the leaves are all the same colour, I have used dark green to represent the large leaves, medium green for the medium leaves and pale green for the small ones.

Pin the leaves in place allowing them to extend beyond the edge of the brown circle. (Make sure they are all right side up.) It is probably best not to let them extend by more than half their length. Make them all a bit different. Sew them in place from below with a small stitch at the base of the leaf (as shown by the light purple yarn in the picture) using the long tails and secure the ends with a couple of small stitches and trim.

0267-landmleaves

(I have used red pins for the large leaves and yellow ones for the medium.)

The stiches below won’t be seen so we don’t have to aim for invisibility.

0267-backofcircle

Now we thread the four small leaves through the central hole.

Pin in place, not extending further than the other leaves (refer to the chart) and sew in place using the long tails as with the other leaves. I think one of them on the photograph may be the wrong way up. I had to adjust later 🙂  ) So do check carefully.

0267-sleavespinned

Now we are ready for the flowers.

0267-leavesdone

Start with one in the middle and thread the two tails through as in this picture.

0267-centreflower

It is best to avoid sewing through the leaves.

Tie the two ends together with a double knot on the other side.

0267-fendssewn

If you aren’t sure of placement don’t trim the ends till later.

Then add the other flowers in an irregular manner so it looks natural.

Tweak the leaves so they are convex (although real plants have concave ones as well) and ruffle the petals – especially if you have made larger flowers.

Which gives you –

 

0267-potofviolets

“Here’s one I made earlier!” – or three!

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Chart and patterns

0267-diagram

Brown circle

DK yarn and 3.5mm hook

Start with a magic loop

Working in spiral and working into each stitch

Rounds

  1. 8dc
  2. 2dc in each dc – (16 dcs)
  3. (2dc, dc) x 8 – (24 dcs)
  4. (2dc dc, dc,) x 8 – (32 dcs)
  5. (2dc, dc, dc, dc) x 8 – (40 dcs)
  6. (2dc, dc, dc, dc, dc) x 8 – (48 dcs)
  7. (2dc, dc, dc, dc, dc, dc) x 8 – (56 dcs)

Continue in this pattern or finish earlier till circle fills top of pot.

Leaves

Small Leaf – make 4

Dark green DK yarn and 3.5mm hook

start with slip knot that can be closed by pulling starting tail.

Ch 7

working into back loops only

Tr into 3rd ch from hook, tr into next, dtr into next, dtr into next.

Dtr and trtr into centre of chain at start then dtr in same chain after knot.

Work into other side of loops in reverse to start, dtr, dtr, tr, tr, 2ch.

Slip stitch into loop made by 2ch at start, pull tight.

4ch for stem. Leave long tail for sewing leaf in place later.

Pull slip knot tight. Sew starting tail at back of leaf up one side of the centre and back down the other side to strengthen spine.

Medium Leaf – make 4

As small leaf but use 4mm hook and work 2dtr, trtr, 2dtr, into chain at start instead of dtr, trtr, dtr. Make 5ch instead of 4ch for stem.

Large Leaf – make 4

As medium leaf but use 4.5mm hook

Flower – make 6

Start with a magic loop

10dc into loop

Then working into each stitch

(1dc, 3ch, 2tr cluster, 3ch) x5

Leave long tail and sew into back of flower so end is near centre opposite to starting tail. Pull starting tail tight.

Flower centre – make 6

Using yellow #10 cotton ( or whatever you have that is similar) and 1.5mm hook

Chain 5, ss into 3rd ch from hook (1 picot),

3ch, ss into 3rd ch from hook (2nd picot),

3ch, ss into 3rd ch from hook (3rd picot),

3ch, ss into 3rd ch from hook (4th picot).

Finish off.

Thread tail through chain before first picot then from below in gap between second and third picots then back through chain before first picot. Pull picots together with tail.

Insert centre through middle of flower and secure ends at back of flower.

Refer to tutorial above for advice on putting component parts together

*****     *****     *****     *****     *****

US version of pattern

Brown circle

Light worsted weight yarn and 3.5mm hook

Start with a magic loop

Working in spiral and working into each stitch

Rounds

  1. 8sc
  2. 2sc in each sc – (16 scs)
  3. (2sc, sc) x 8 – (24 scs)
  4. (2sc sc, sc,) x 8 – (32 scs)
  5. (2sc, sc, sc, sc) x 8 – (40 scs)
  6. (2sc, sc, sc, sc, sc) x 8 – (48 scs)
  7. (2sc, sc, sc, sc, sc, sc) x 8 – (56 scs)

Continue in this pattern or finish earlier till circle fills top of pot.

Leaves

Small Leaf – make 4

Dark green worsted weight yarn and 3.5mm hook

start with slip knot that can be closed by pulling starting tail.

Ch 7

working into back loops only

Dc into 3rd ch from hook, dc into next, tr into next, tr into next.

Tr and dtr into centre of chain at start then tr in same chain after knot.

Work into other side of loops in reverse to start, tr, tr, dc, dc, 2ch.

Slip stitch into loop made by 2ch at start, pull tight.

4ch for stem. Leave long tail for sewing leaf in place later.

Pull slip knot tight. Sew starting tail at back of leaf up one side of the centre and back down the other side to strengthen spine.

Medium Leaf – make 4

As small leaf but use 4mm hook and work 2tr, dtr, 2tr, into chain at start instead of tr, dtr, tr. Make 5ch instead of 4ch for stem.

Large Leaf – make 4

As medium leaf but use 4.5mm hook

Flower – make 6

Start with a magic loop

10sc into loop

Then working into each stitch

(1sc, 3ch, 2dc cluster, 3ch) x5

Leave long tail and sew into back of flower so end is near centre opposite to starting tail. Pull starting tail tight.

Flower centre – make 6

Using yellow #10 cotton ( or whatever you have that is similar) and 1.5mm hook

Chain 5, ss into 3rd ch from hook (1 picot),

3ch, ss into 3rd ch from hook (2nd picot),

3ch, ss into 3rd ch from hook (3rd picot),

3ch, ss into 3rd ch from hook (4th picot).

Finish off.

Thread tail through chain before first picot then from below in gap between second and third picots then back through chain before first picot. Pull picots together with tail.

Insert centre through middle of flower and secure ends at back of flower.

Refer to tutorial above for advice on putting component parts together

A Quickie Blanket

This as you may guess is another part of my knitted doll birthday present project. It is almost 18″ (45cm) per side.

0260-dollblanket

However it is a much quicker way of making a blanket than my previous ones as I only started on Thursday evening and finished it Sunday afternoon. Which means I could probably make a full sized blanket in about half the time I normally take.

As it is for my grandson I decided to just have a simple dc edging.

In a way this is a style of blanket I have been wanting to make for the last two years.

Around the time I started my blog I found someone who was selling granny baby blankets with repeating sequences of colours and I thought about what colours and patterning I would choose if I made something similar and I came up with this

0260-sample

and put it in my sampler pile. So I am very pleased to have finally made the blanket even if it is a small version.

Another thing that pleased me was that having read somewhere that there was a way of starting a row with a treble (US dc) instead of three chain when beginning a new colour, I worked out how to do it and it worked perfectly.

I like to start my rows in the middle of a corner. So in the picture below the three trebles to the left of centre are the first granny group of the row. I think you can see, especially on the white, that the first stitch of the group is a treble and not three chain.

0260-start-finish

 

Looking on the internet today there seem to be a variety of ways of doing it (I have just found two) but my way is slightly different.

One way is to start with a slip knit on your hook. That was my first idea but I found that it left you with a knot and was not necessary.

You start by folding the new yarn over the hook. (Obviously this is described as for a right handed person.)

0260-tutorial1

Then you fold the tail under to the left and over to the right as in this picture.

0260-tutorial2

Then pull tight and place the twist on the far side of the hook a little way from the end.

0260-tutorial3

From now on you press your right forefinger tightly against the twist to hold it in place.

Pick up a loop of thread and insert the hook in the work, as usual.

0260-tutorial4

Draw through a loop, as usual.

0260-tutorial5

Then draw more yarn through the first two loops (again as usual). This is the point to press really tightly on the twist and not lose your nerve as the stitch seems to stretch out.

0260-tutorial6

You now need to change your hold to your left hand as you pick up the a new loop of yarn ready to pull through the last two loops on the hook.

0260-tutorial7

Pull the picked up yarn through the last two loops and there you are

0260-tutorial8

Pull gently on the tail to take up any slack and you can continue with the rest of the row.

This means that your starting and finishing tails are on the same level which I quite like.

Addendum to sock tutorial

Now I have turned the heel I have two things to add which I will add the the earlier tutorial but also include here and they are –

  1. When turning the heel don’t let the end stitches on the needle holder stretch because if you do you will need to tighten them back up by loosening the other stitches that have tightened to enable them to stretch. (I had to do this; I will put my spare stitches on something light like a piece of yarn next time.)
  2. The best way to increase the number of stiches back up to the right number, after having done the K2togs on the first round, is to do an M1 – which is to say pick up the strand between the stitch that had been on the holder and the decrease stitch and knit into the back (so there is no hole). This actually helps tighten everything up.

Pictures of the heel to show the result.

0226-addheel1
Right side of heel
0226-addheel2
Left side of heel

Toe-up socks with wraps – mini tutorial

With so many blogs talking about making socks and the yarn for my next blanket not having arrived yet, I could resist the urge no longer and have started another pair of socks.

0225-newsock

Now I have always made toe-up socks (using short rows with wrapped stitches) because I am not very good at picking up stitches (as happens with top-down socks) and I like the way they look but that is not to say that I have not had difficulties.

Now maybe you are not interested in making toe-up socks or maybe you do but have no problems at all. In which case this post is probably of no interest. I have written it just in case there is anyone out there who has had the same issues as myself.

Problem 1 – wrapped stitches

The problems I have had have been in knitting (or purling) the double wrapped stitches with their wraps when making short-row toes and heels. I have sometimes split the yarn and or dropped the stitch and had to pick it up again, all in all, giving a messy result.

I think that some other people must also find this a bit tricky too, as I have come across a couple of alternatives to the wraps. I have experimented with these but ended up deciding that I think the wraps method gives a better result.

But recently I had a bit of a breakthrough in my thinking and have developed a fairly problem free method of dealing with the wrapped stitches.

Problem 2 – holes when changing to circular knitting

Another problem I have had has been making sure that a hole didn’t develop at the end of the wrapped part when transitioning to circular knitting. The generic sock pattern I have been working from talks vaguely about picking up extra stitches on the first round and then decreasing on a later round. I have tried this ‘picking up and later decreasing’ but sometimes the process seemed to create more problems (= holes) than it solved and took a few rounds to sort out (badly!).

Like here.

0225-messybit

However I have made four pairs of toe-up socks which equals eight socks which equals sixteen short row heels or toes. In the course of this I have discovered a much simpler method of ensuring that there are no holes and I would like to share this as well in case it can be of help to anyone.

Tutorial section

I am assuming that like me you pull the yarn firmly but not tightly when wrapping the stiches and knitting the following stitch, so as not to create unnecessary slackness in the yarn.

Knitting stitches with their wraps

Here is the stitch ready to be knitted.

0225-01stwithwraps
Stitch with two wraps ready to be knitted

Firstly, you slide the stitch from the left needle onto the right hand needle and from now on keep your eye, and probably your finger, on it to make sure that it stays there.

Right needle in stitch
Right needle in stitch
Stitch on right needle
Stitch on right needle

Now picking up the two wraps with the left needle will be no more difficult that picking up two stitches when doing something like a K2tog. I aim at the centre of the loops.

Wraps on left needle
Wraps on left needle

Once the stitches are cleanly on the left hand needle with no split yarn you can easily slip the right needle through the back of them. Remembering the finger of course!

Right needle through wraps
Right needle through wraps

Now it is safe to remove the left needle, (though I often find with knitting stitches, I can simply insert the left needle through the remaining stitch without removing it.)

Left needle removed
Left needle removed

Lastly you insert the left needle through all three loops in front of the right needle which should be straightforward as they are cleanly and securely on the right needle.

Both needles through all three loops
Both needles through all three loops

(I haven’t done a picture as it would have been too difficult but if there is any uncertainty you can look through the hole below the right needle from the point of that needle.)

Now you can wrap the yarn round the right needle in the normal way

Yarn over needle
Yarn over needle

pull through

0225-09yarnthrough
Yarn pulled through

and complete the stitch.

Completed stitch
Completed stitch

You may notice that I keep the stitches well down the needles whenever possible.

The procedure is essentially the same for purling but I have included a few pictures for completeness.

Purling stitches with their wraps

The stitch ready to be purled.

Stitch to be purled
Stitch to be purled

Slid onto the right needle.

Stitch on right needle
Stitch on right needle

Picking up the wraps with the left.

0225-24wrapsonln
Wraps picked up on left needle

Right needle through the wraps.

Right needle through wraps
Right needle through wraps

Left needle removed and inserted through all three loops behind the right needle.

Both needles through loops
Both needles through loops

Yarn pulled through as usual.

0225-29yarnthrough
Yarn pulled through

Stitch completed.

Stitch completed
Stitch completed

Ensuring no holes

When you have knitted and purled all the wrapped stitches and are ready to pick up the stitches from your provisional cast on, the important thing is to make sure that you put the first and last of the picked up stitches on appropriate needles next to the adjoining first or last stitch you have been knitting on the straight needles. The reason for this is so that as you work back along the stitches you have just been using you can knit the end stitches together (K2tog).

So you start your first round with a K2tog and you have another about half-way round.

Now

You are going to say to me ” But now I am two stitches short!” – my original response is below the pictures.

Since writing this tutorial I have turned another toe and heel (on my second sock) and have decided that the best method is to knit the first two end stitches together as described above, then the second lot at the other end of the heel stitches, then straight after do an  M1 – which is to say pick up the strand before the next stitch and knit into the back (so there is no hole).  When you get back to the beginning do an M1 as before into the last gap. So now you are back to the right number of stitches.

[However, this is still a work in progress for the perfect solution and I read something where the person suggested you start knitting in the round when you have knitted the last wrapped stitch but still have one left to purl. I want to try this.]

0225-noholes

0225-noholes2

Addendum

After turning the first heel I had two things to add and they were –

  1. When turning the heel don’t let the end stitches on the needle holder stretch because if you do you will need to tighten them back up by loosening the other stitches that have tightened to enable them to stretch. (I had to do this; I will put my spare stitches on something light like a piece of yarn next time.)
  2. The best way to increase the number of stiches back up to the right number, after having done the K2togs on the first round, is to do an M1 – which is to say pick up the strand between the stitch that had been on the holder and the decrease stitch and knit into the back (so there is no hole). This actually helps tighten everything up.

Pictures of the heel to show the result.

0226-addheel1
Right side of heel
0226-addheel2
Left side of heel

This was my original response to the question of compensating for the K2togs

I have not decided on a ‘best’ solution to this and I think it depends on how you feel about these things, and maybe the shape of your feet and ankles, but there are a few solutions which I will list below.

  1. You could simply increase in the decrease stitches on the next round. (I was afraid when I started this sock that that might make a hole – though I now think I am wrong – so I chose a different method.
  2. I cast on an extra two stitches at the beginning and, forgetting about the heels – now having an extra four stitches – knitted two together on the second round as well.
  3. If you don’t mind having an extra two stitches when doing the foot you could leave these two extra stitches on the top half of the sock and use them when doing the K2togs for the heel.

When doing the heels if you don’t have two extra stitches already, as in option three, you could either increase after the short-rows, as in option one, or increase at both ends of the last row of the stitches you will put on a needle holder while making the heel.

I hope this doesn’t sound too confusing – but I always think choice is good!

Crochet Baubles

Last Christmas I showed you these crochet baubles I bought in Paperchase.

Crochet balls

And told you that I would like to make some myself for the next year.

Well! that time has come but with wanting to finish two blankets and some Christmas gifts to make as well I have not progressed as much as I would have hoped. However it still seems appropriate to share with you what I have managed to do, with a bit of a tutorial in case you are inspired to make some yourselves.

I decided to start by using the balls I had as inspiration for working up a pattern. I also persuaded my daughter to give me one of the plastic balls that were lying around the house that had come out of a small home ball pit.

The first pattern I used (copy included at end) gave me this:-

202-bauble1

I used #10 crochet cotton and a 2mm hook as the shop balls seemed to have been made loosely and this gave me something that fitted nicely over my ball. (The ball was about 70mm in diameter – a little smaller than the ones I had bought but I actually like them better that way.)

I bought some School PVA glue. (This was cheaper than the ‘Craft’ glue and was washable so I thought it would mix better with water – I have never used it before; maybe some of you know more about using it). I mixed one teaspoon of glue with 1 teaspoon of water in an egg cup and thoroughly soaked the crochet in the glue water mixture.

I covered the ball in vaseline (petroleum jelly) to stop the crochet sticking to it. (More on this later).

202-vaselinedball

Apologies for the mess in the background. 🙂

I stretched the crochet hemispere over the ball

202-drying

and put it in the airing cupboard to dry.

Here is a ‘before and after’ picture.

202-beforeandafter

I then made a second hemisphere and did the same.

However I began to realise that the vaseline, or the moisture, had softened the ball and it was getting harder to get the dents out of it so I decided that maybe it would be better to cover it with a piece of cling film: not quite as smooth but good enough.

202-withclingfilm

Looking closely at the balls I had bought I decided that the two halves had been stuck together with polystyrene glue so that is what I did and got this:-

202-bauble1joined

I also worked up a different pattern which was less lacey based on another of the balls but this was less satisfactory (though not entirely unusable) so I won’t bother to share this pattern with you.

This made the following

202-bauble2

I don’t know if you can see but they are less naturally rounded than the first and, though it is hard to see in a photo, I also made a mistake and on one of the rows: I used trebles (US dcs) for one and double trebles (US trs) for the other.

However they did dry fairly rounded when stretched over the ball.

202-bauble2joined

This second time I had intended to make both halves first and stretch them over the ball at the same time to make the two edges more easily match up but another shortcoming of this pattern was that they did not quite meet so in fact the ball is not truly spherical and the one half fits inside the other to a certain extent because of my mistake in the pattern. (I forgot to write it out as I went 🙂 )

202-onesidesmaller

I think though that hung on a Christmas tree it is still usable. I have yet to add a loop to hang them by and it would probably have been easier to do this before I stuck the two halves together.

Here they are together.

202-together

And here is the pattern I used for the first, lacey ball.

Christmas Bauble pattern

My recommendation would be to use a polystyrene ball that can be found in a craft shop and cover with cling film though I have yet to do it this way.

Using the cotton and hook size given below the ball should be about 70mm in diameter.

I used Anchor Aida #10 crochet cotton and a 2mm hook.

UK version

Starting with a magic loop or other preferred method.

Row1: 6ch, then working into the centre of the loop (tr, 3ch) five times and s.s. into 3rd ch at start..

Row 2: S.s. left till you get into loop, 6ch, tr into same loop, 3ch then (tr, 3ch) twice into each of next five loops, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 3: 3ch, [(2ch, dc, 2ch, ) into loop tr into tr] eleven times, then (2ch, dc, 2ch) into last loop, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 4: 7ch, (tr into tr, 4ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 5: 3ch, [(3ch, dc, 3ch, ) into loop tr into tr] eleven times, then (3ch, dc, 3ch) into last loop, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 6: 8ch, (tr into tr, 5ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 7: As Row 5.

Row 8: 9ch, (tr into tr, 6ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 9: As Row 5.

Row 10: 9ch, (tr into tr, 6ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start. Or else instead of the tr, use a dc or s.s. – whatever makes the shape cover half the ball.

US version

Starting with a magic loop or other preferred method.

Row1: 6ch, then working into loop (dc, 3ch) five times and s.s. into 3rd ch at start..

Row 2: S.s. left till you get into loop 6ch, dc into same loop, 3ch then (dc, 3ch) twice into each of next five loops, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 3: 3ch, [(2ch, sc, 2ch, ) into loop dc into dc] eleven times, then (2ch, sc, 2ch) into last loop, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 4: 7ch, (dc into dc, 4ch) five times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 5: 3ch, [(3ch, sc, 3ch, ) into loop dc into dc] eleven times, then (3ch, sc, 3ch) into last loop, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 6: 8ch, (dc into dc, 5ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 7: As Row 5.

Row 8: 9ch, (dc into dc, 6ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start.

Row 9: As Row 5.

Row 10: 9ch, (dc into dc, 6ch) eleven times, s.s. into 3rd ch at start. Or else instead of the dc, use an sc or s.s. – whatever makes the shape cover half the ball.

*****     *****     *****     *****     *****

I am hoping in time to try out other patterns although I must say that I particularly like this one. I would also like to make the balls in a variety of colours. I may share these with you if and when I complete them.

Granny Bunting tutorial

As requested by http://themeepingkoala.wordpress.com/ I am sharing my granny bunting pattern.

166-bunting

I decided to do it as a tutorial.

As a general guide: I used Rico Essentials Cotton nominal DK [US 8ply] (but to my mind a little thinner) and a 4mm [US no. 6] hook to make bunting triangles about 4 inches (10cm) each side. But obviously you could use any yarn and an appropriate sized hook.

I started with a magic circle.

166-01-magiccircle

Then made 3 chain (ch) as a starting treble [US dc].

166-02-3chain

I will describe in full making the first treble [US dc]

Yarn round hook

166-03-yarnover

Hook through magic circle loop

166-04-throughloop

Pull a loop of yarn through to give three loops on hook.

166-05-threeloops

Then pick up a loop of yarn

166-06-pullthrough

and pull through two loops nearest hook to give.

166-07-pullthroughagain

Pull yarn through last two loops and you have a completed treble (tr) [US dc].

166-08-treblecomplete

Work another tr [US dc] into the loop and you get the first of your ‘granny’ three treble [US dcs] group.

166-09-anothertreble

You then need to make 3 ch for the corner

166-10-add3chain

and another 3 trs [US dcs] into the loop.

166-11-add3trs

You have the first corner.

Then you work another 3 ch for your second corner

166-12-3morechs

followed by another 3 trs ([US dcs] into the loop.

166-13-last3trs

Then work 3 ch

166-14-last3chs

and draw the loose end tight to close the loop.

166-15-drawtight

You now work a slip stitch to close the round  by inserting the hook into the third of the starting three chains

166-16-slipstitch

and pulling a loop of thread through the stitch and the loop on the hook.

166-17-rowcomplete

*****     *****    *****    *****    *****

If I was changing colour at this point I would join a new colour before the slip stitch thus:

I would tie in the new yarn (I show the knot loose so it is easier to see but I would in fact pull it tight.)

Then pull the new yarn through the stitch and loop on hook.

166-19-slipstitch

To give –

166-20-slipstitchdone

*****     *****    *****    *****    *****

I have my own way of starting a new round for a granny square, circle or triangle which is the following.

I pull the loop out to make it larger

166-21-pullloop

Then I pull it through the corner from back to front.

166-22-pullloopthrough

so it is the right size to start making stitches in the middle of the corner.

I then make the starting 3 ch tr [or US dc] equivalent.

166-23-3ch

followed by 2 trs [US dcs].

166-24-3tr

This completes half a corner. Between corners I use 1 ch to separate the groups of trs [US dcs].

166-25-1ch

Now we work the next corner but making 3 trs [US dcs] into the corner on the previous round.

166-26-3tr

followed by 3 ch

166-27-3tr&3ch

and a further 3 trs [US dcs] into the same corner gap.

166-28-anothercorner

Now we work into the next corner in the same way making – 1ch, 3trs [US dcs], 3 ch, 3trs [US dcs].

166-29-secondcorner

And we finish the last corner by working 1 ch followed by 3trs [US dcs] into the corner.

166-30-lastcorner

then 3 ch.

166-31-lastcorner3ch

And joining with a slip stitch (sl st) as before.

166-32-2ndrowcomplete

For the next round the corners are worked in the same way but in the 1 ch gap between corners we work 3trs [US dcs] separating the 3tr [US dc] groups by 1ch, but still using 3ch for the corners as before.

Giving

166-33-3rdrowcomplete

This process can be continued as long as you wish depending on how big you want the bunting.

Each round has three corners with one extra 3 tr [US dc] group for the third row, two for the fourth, three for the fifth and so on………………

Here I show you a chart for the five rows that I used for mine.

166-buntingchart

As in my previous post

0163-finishedtriangles

The triangles tend to be a little rounded so to make them more crisply triangular it is a good idea to pin then out and iron them. I used a little spray starch with mine as I was using a cotton yarn.

0163-pinnedout

I found the easiest way to join them into bunting was to take two strands of the cotton yarn and make a chain. After a few inches I slip stitched into the corner of a triangle then proceeded thus:

sl st into corner, 3ch, then repeated (sl st between groups, 3ch) until I reached the last corner when I did another sl st and then a few chain (5 I think) before slip stitching into the corner of the next triangle.

Ans so my bunting was complete.

0163-bunting

Crochet Christmas cards


These are really easy to make.

First you make the stars.

I always think six-pointed stars for Christmas cards as a reference to the six-pointed ‘Star of David’ as Jesus was a Jew and was born in the ‘City of David’.

(Pattern at the end in UK and US versions.)

I used Twilley’s Goldfingering in silver and gold and a 2mm hook.

I also bought folded A5 sheets of card and matching envelopes from ‘Paperchase’ in dark blue.

I cut myself a piece of white card A6 size and marked out a hexagon where I wanted the star to go and then placed it on top of the front of the unfolded card. Underneath I placed an odd piece of polystyrene that I had so I could stick the end of my compass through the points of the hexagon.

Originally I was going to cut a hole and fit the star in it, which is why I have the extra lines. All you need is a hexagon.

(Mine was marked out using a vertical central line to locate the centre of the circle and top and bottom points then the normal straight edge and compass way of drawing a hexagon using a radius of 1.5 inches, which seemed about right).

You need to pull the points on the star well to work out the correct diameter. The holes should be where the points are when stretched.

You then push a sharp pin, needle or compass point through the corners of the hexagon and remove the white card.

Then take a piece of sewing cotton; I found about 18 inches (45cm)  was a good length; and make a good knot on the end and thread through one of the holes.

You then make a small stitch into the back of one of the 3 chain points and thread the needle back through the same hole being careful not to go into the thread coming out of the hole.

Repeat this procedure for each hole in turn going round the hexagon. You then need to gently pull the cotton on the back and the points on the front till the points of the star hide the holes and the cotton at the back is taut.

Then turn over

and finish off the thread by doing several stitches as illustrated: first into the starting length by the knot to make the loop tight and then to the final length to secure the end.

If I had beautiful handwriting I might have done the words below the star with my gold and silver pens but as my handwriting is very uneven I bought peel off words at a craft shop.

I would have preferred two sheets the same as the silver one but there was not a lot of choice. The silver letters came off so easily but the gold ones were very tricky.

Finally I stuck a label on the back of the front of the card with instructions on removing the star after Christmas is over.

The card and the envelope together cost me 75p. The Goldfingering was £3.50 a ball and I think one ball will make about a dozen stars so say 30p a star. The lettering sheets were 89p each. So I think the cards should cost me a bit less than £1.20 each to make. I haven’t made them all yet but expect to do about two dozen.

Christmas Star patterns

UK version

Using Twilleys goldfingering in silver or gold and a 2.00mm hook.

Start: 6 ch loop.

Row 1: Working into the loop: 7ch (= 1dtr + 3ch), dc, 3ch, then repeat {dtr, 3ch, dc, 3ch} 5 times. Slst into 7ch loop at start.

Row 2: Repeat {6ch, slst into top of dtr) six times. Last slst is into slst of previous row.

Row 3: Repeat {4ch, tr into 6ch loop of previous row, 4ch, slst into slst of previous row.} six times.

Row 4: Repeat {6ch, dtr into top of tr on row below, 6ch, slst into slst of row below} six times.

Row 5: Repeat {dc under loops of rows 3 & 4, 5dc under loop of row 4 only, 3ch, 5dc under loop of row 4 only, dc under loops of row 3 & 4.} six times. Slst to fix final dc.

Pinch the 3ch at the tips of the points and pull hard. Sew in the ends

US version

Using Twilleys goldfingering in silver or gold and a 1/B hook.

Start: 6 ch loop.

Row 1: Working into the loop: 7ch (= 1trc + 3ch), sc, 3ch, then repeat {trc, 3ch, sc, 3ch} 5 times. Slst into 7ch loop at start.

Row 2: Repeat {6ch, slst into top of trc) six times. Last slst is into slst of previous row.

Row 3: Repeat {4ch, dc into 6ch loop of previous row, 4ch, slst into slst of previous row.} six times.

Row 4: Repeat {6ch, trc into top of dc on row below, 6ch, slst into slst of row below} six times.

Row 5: Repeat {sc under loops of rows 3 & 4, 5sc under loop of row 4 only, 3ch, 5sc under loop of row 4 only, sc under loops of row 3 & 4.} six times. Slst to fix final sc.

Pinch the 3ch at the tips of the points and pull hard. Sew in the ends.

*  *  *  *  *

As always please let me know if you find any mistakes.

Really Easy Snowflake Patterns

There are many incredibly delicate and complex crochet snowflakes but I had problems even with ones that I thought looked simpler so here are my Really Easy Snowflakes Patterns.

I started using the sock yarn for the white socks but that makes very small fiddly snowflakes so I switched to DK (US worsted weight) yarn. My default size hook for this yarn is 4.5mm but I used a 4mm one to make them a bit firmer. I have used a pale blue yarn instead of the white for the step by step pictures because I think it makes the stitches easier to see.

You could really use almost any weight yarn and any hook depending on how big you want them but I think firm is best. Pulling the points may be necessary.

I am using UK crochet terms but I have done a simple ‘pattern only’ US version at the bottom.

Please point out any errors if you notice them.

Large

This only has four rows and only the last one is at all fiddly.

I used the Magic Loop Method to start all my snowflakes but you can use whatever is your favourite method.

I am not very good at draughtsmanship but here is a drawing I did for my project book that I thought gives a good idea of how the yarn goes for this method if you are a beginner.

Magic loop diagram

Row 1: 3ch=1st tr

then 11trs into hole.

Join with a slip stitch into the third chain at the beginning.

When I was beginning crocheting in the round it took me a while to realise but ‘working into the third chain’ meant working into the first place that it was easy to get into, that is almost above the first of the trebles.

First row complete

Row 2

When working into gaps I like to start by pulling the yarn through the gap to the right (the one before the three chain of the previous row)

and then pulling it to the right of the gap before working any more trebles.

Row 2: 3ch = 1st tr then 1tr, 1ch working into the gap to the right of the (3ch=1st tr) of the previous row.

Then work (2tr, 1ch) eleven more times, working into each gap between the trebles of the previous row. Slip stitch together as first row.

Second row complete

Row 3:
3ch = 1st tr then 2tr into the first space.

then (tr, 4ch, tr) into the next space.

Then alternate this with (3tr) into each space to the end. Slip stitch together as first row.

Third row complete

Row 4
Have you ever reflected on the fact that even single crochet stitches do not really sit neatly on top of each other but are actually slightly offset like the three treble groups are when doing granny squares.

So I decided for reasons of symmetry to work 4dc above the 3tr of the previous row.

Row 4: 2ch=1dc, then a further 2dc into the stitch holes (3 & 4) as in the picture above.

Then work a Trefoil = (2dc, 3ch, slst, 5ch, slst, 3ch 2dc) into the gap below the 4ch of the previous row. You can push the stitches along to the right if you feel you are running out of space for this.

Trefoil – chain loops opened up to make it easier to see

Then work 4dc over the 3tr groups as in the picture (holes 1,2,3,4) and the trefoils into the loops – all the way round.

Finish with a last dc into hole 1 and slst together into 2nd chain at start.

I have used 3-5-3 for the chains in the trefoil because I liked it best but for variety you could use 3-3-3, 5-5-5 or 5-7-5.

You could also try increasing the number of chains between the 3tr groups on row 3. But then of course you would need to increase the number of dcs in the trefoil.

Extra Large

This is similar to the large one but has five rows.

Row 1 & Row 2: are the same as the large.

Row 3: is similar to Row 3 above but you alternate 3tr with (2ch, 2tr, 2ch).

Row 4: Slst left to middle tr of row below. Then repeat (5ch, 2tr into gap between trs below, 5ch, slst into centre of 3tr from row below. [ I use hole 2 from my picture for this].) 6 times.

Row 5

I am going to call a slst into gap between 2 trs of row below – ssg

Row 5: Repeat (5dc into chain loop, ssg , 4ch, ssg, 7ch, ssg, 4ch, ssg, 5dc into next chain loop) 6 times.

End with slst into first dc to end.

Medium

This owes a lot to this free pattern. http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/snowflake-coaster-or-ornament especially for the second and third rows.

Row 1: as Large snowflake.

Row 2: (ch3, slst into next ch) 12 times. Last slst is into first st.

Row 3: On this row you alternate (dc into loop, ch4) with (dc into loop, ch2) and join with a slst.

Row 4: On this row you work a (3dc, 5ch, 3dc) into the larger loops and (dc, 3ch, dc) into the smaller loops and finish off with a slst into a likely hole.

Small

This only has 3 rows! The only thing that makes it all fiddly is the size.

Again I started with the Magic Loop but instead of 12trs I worked 12dcs into the loop.

Row 1: 2ch = 1st dc, 11dc into loop, slst together into 2nd chain.

Row 2: (5ch miss a st and slst into next one) 6 times. Last slst is into starting stitch. If you find you can’t miss a st for the last loop that means you have missed two sts at the start. (well that’s what I did sometimes).

Row 3: Trefoil into each loop as in the first pattern – which is (2dc, 3ch, slst, 5ch, slst, 3dc, 2dc) into each loop.

My very small one was done using a 3-3-3 pattern for the trefoil. I did have to pull extra hard on the points to get this one to lie flat.

Again variations in the size of loop and trefoil pattern are possible.

US Version Patterns

Large

This only has four rows and only the last one is at all fiddly.

I used the Magic Loop Method to start all my snowflakes but you can use whatever is your favourite method.

Row 1: 3ch=1st dc then 11dcs into hole. Join with a slip stitch into the third chain at the beginning.

Row 2

When working into gaps I like to start by pulling the yarn through the gap to the right (the one before the three chain of the previous row) pulling it to the right of the gap before working any more dcs.

Row 2: 3ch = 1st dc then 1dc, 1ch working into the gap to the right of the (3ch=1st dc) of the previous row. Then work (2dc, 1ch) eleven more times, working into each gap between the dcs of the previous row. Slip stitch together as first row.

Row 3: 3ch = 1st dc then 2dc into the first space then (dc, 4ch, dc) into the next space.

Then alternate this with (3dc) into each space to the end. Slip stitch together as first row.

Row 4: 2ch=1sc, then a further 2sc into the stitch holes (3 & 4) as in the picture above.

Then work a Trefoil = (2sc, 3ch, slst, 5ch, slst, 3ch 2sc) into the gap below the 4ch of the previous row. You can push the stitches along to the right if you feel you are running out of space for this.

Then work 4sc over the 3dc groups as in the picture (holes 1,2,3,4) and the trefoils into the loops – all the way round.

Finish with a last sc into hole 1 and slst together into 2nd chain at start.

I have used 3-5-3 for the chains in the trefoil because I liked it best but for variety you could use 3-3-3, 5-5-5 or 5-7-5.

You could also try increasing the number of chains between the 3dc groups on row 3. But then of course you would need to increase the number of scs in the trefoil.

Extra Large

This is similar to the large one but has five rows.

Row 1 & Row 2: are the same as the large.

Row 3: is similar to Row 3 above but you alternate 3dc with (2ch, 2dc, 2ch).

Row 4: Slst left to middle dc of row below. Then repeat (5ch, 2dc into gap between dcs below, 5ch, slst into centre of 3dc from row below. [ I use hole 2 from my picture for this].) 6 times.

Row 5

I am going to call a slst into gap between 2 dcs of row below – ssg

Row 5: Repeat (5sc into chain loop, ssg , 4ch, ssg, 7ch, ssg, 4ch, ssg, 5sc into next chain loop) 6 times.

End with slst into first sc to end.

Medium

This owes a lot to this free pattern. http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/snowflake-coaster-or-ornament especially for the second and third rows.

Row 1: as Large snowflake.

Row 2: (ch3, slst into next ch) 12 times. Last slst is into first st.

Row 3: On this row you alternate (sc into loop, ch4) with (sc into loop, ch2) and join with a slst.

Row 4: On this row you work a (3sc, 5ch, 3sc) into the larger loops and (sc, 3ch, sc) into the smaller loops and finish off with a slst into a likely hole.

Small

This only has 3 rows! The only thing that makes it all fiddly is the size.

Again I started with the Magic Loop but instead of 12dcs I worked 12scs into the loop.

Row 1: 2ch = 1st sc, 11sc into loop, slst together into 2nd chain.

Row 2: (5ch miss a st and slst into next one) 6 times. Last slst is into starting stitch. If you find you can’t miss a st for the last loop that means you have missed two sts at the start. (well that’s what I did sometimes).

Row 3: Trefoil into each loop as in the first pattern – which is (2sc, 3ch, slst, 5ch, slst, 3dc, 2sc) into each loop.

My very small one was done using a 3-3-3 pattern for the trefoil. I did have to pull extra hard on the points to get this one to lie flat.

Again variations in the size of loop and trefoil pattern are possible.

Finally getting down to the sock(s)

First, of course, I had to knit a square (well actually a rectangle) to help me get an idea of my tension on this particular yarn.  Then work out how many stitches to use as the pattern I am following is a measure your foot and work it out sort of thing.  I also had to work out increases for the leg and I hope I’ve got it right because I don’t really know what you are supposed to do.

Then I had to decide on the patterning, if any. Something like my over the knee socks (which I took to mean a bit of texture in between flat stocking stitch vertical stripes) had been requested. I trawled through sock pattern after sock pattern on the web, only to realise that such patterns were not common.

However, I stopped to examine more closely a pattern that was all over what I think was called an ‘always right twist’.  I realised that this might provide a motif that I could use for my stripes and what was even more exciting was that as a motif it was just like a sort of rib except for a fancy stitch once every five rows. So I tried a couple of inches to see if it would work.  I increase the number of purl stitches either side from one to two after a few rows so that is why it looks a bit odd.

I decide that I liked it and it is so easy I might find I don’t end up having to do too much undoing when I go wrong.

The ‘always right twist’ stitch is just so easy – the pictures do enlarge if you wish to see more closely.

First you knit two together but leave the stitches on the left hand needle
Then you insert the needle between those two stitches and into the one on the right and knit it
Finally you pull the stitches off the left hand needle and it’s done

I then started with the disposable cast on and the wraps to make the toe of the sock.

I did end up having to undo a few rows, which was discouraging, as I wasn’t sure if I had done all the wraps right and some looked a bit loose. But maybe I shouldn’t have tried to do it while watching the qualifying for the Monaco Grand Prix.

I find knitting or crocheting while watching a Grand Prix is really good because it helps calm me down during the anxiety provoking / exciting bits and is something to attend to during the boring bits. Qualifying was much too exciting. 🙂

However I have now got this far.

I still cannot believe that I am knitting with such a fine yarn on such small needles.

Now the sock is well under way maybe I will allow myself to get out my new cotton yarn and see if the squares for my flower cloth come out the right size.

One last picture for you all

I wrote about all the things I had won from cuteasabutton’s birthday giveaway and said that I thought I would use the brooch on my jacket. Well I found an even better place for it: on my sun hat.

I am one of those people who have to wear a hat if I am out in the sun for any length of time because otherwise I get a headache. So I have a cotton easy to pack sun hat but I sometimes think when I am going out looking relatively smart that maybe it looks a bit too like a hat for the beach but now I have added the brooch and I think it looks quite stylish!

Oh! and I’ve been using my blanket for it’s original purpose on my bed: as an adjunct to a sheet and it works very well.