More Fair Isle experiments

Because yes, the cowl and hat were in their own way experiments in knitting fair isle.

Now, looking back, I don’t think that my parents were very good teachers, though I learnt a lot by watching them. However my mother knitted too fast for me to learn much by watching and so fair isle knitting was a matter of picking up that you used two colours for a row and twisted them together every so often so you didn’t have long hanging strands but also twisted them back the other way so the yarns didn’t get tangled plus seeing the back of my mother’s fair isle.

As in this photograph. 0548-mothers-fairisle-reverseWhen I tried, even years later when I was an adult and was desperate to learn, what tended to happen was that the stitches were very uneven and the foreground colour tended to pull. As well, I could never sort out a method of twisting the yarn that I could remember, so at the end of the row the yarns were wound round each other many times.

0548-my-fairisle-reverseFor the cowl and hat I let myself have strands across the back for one to three stitches and so there wasn’t the same pulling.

Deciding to put the balls of yarn, one on the right and one on the left helped to remember which was which and I soon started to think of the one on the right as the ‘top’ yarn and the one on the left as the ‘lower’ yarn.

Having later read about fair isle on line I found that this was a distinction that was made.

And thus I learnt to twist the top yarn ‘under’ the other and then on the following stitch to pull it over again and so lose the twist. Doing the opposite for the lower yarn.

Now it was time to see if I could knit fair isle like my mother

In THIS POST I talk about how I was using the English way of knitting for the right hand yarn and the continental for the left, although picking up the yarn continental fashion hurt my wrist.

But now I decided to hold both yarns in my right hand, holding the yarn with three fingers while the forefinger separated the two yarns and the thumb helped with the twisting.

I started with a circular needle as then every row would be knit. 0556-circular-knitting-right-sideI used the checkerboard pattern my mother had used for the knitting bag and some of the patterns from my plan for the hat, including the one I didn’t use. The reverse looks like this. 0556-circular-knitting-reverseI was pleased that it looked as if I had finally cracked it! So I decided to undo my sample and knit up some more fair isle with straight needles. 0556-flat-knitting-right-sideand the reverse. 0556-flat-knitting-reverseIt took me a while to feel comfortable with the purl rows. In the end I decided that treating the right hand yarn as if it was the lower yarn for the purl side and vice versa seemed the most natural.

All I need now is a reason to knit something which requires fair isle knitting! Plain colours next time though so that the patterns show more clearly.

Addendum

For anyone who like me finds the instruction of twisting yarn for fair isle that merely says twist clockwise and then twist in the opposite direction is not helpful enough here is what I do.

When I am using the left hand ‘lower’ yarn and wanting to make a twist, I pull a loop of the yarn back towards me under the other (right hand – top yarn) and use this yarn to wind round the needle, thus moving it above the other. For the next stitch I pull the main part of the yarn and knit with that. Restoring the status quo.

When knitting with the right hand ‘top’ yarn I pull a loop forward under the other yarn and knit with that, then pull the main yarn up and over and knit as normal. This removes any twist.

This way you undo the twist as soon as you make it and so never have to remember what you did last time.

If you want to twist frequently like my mother used to do this is the way I think of it.

If all you are doing is knitting one stitch of a colour in a sequence, you knit as normal. If you are knitting two stitches you knit the one after the other as described above. For three or more stitches: if it is an even number you simply work every two stitches as above. For odd numbers work the first stitch as normal that the rest of the stitches as for an even number.

 

Just add a Hat!

After I made the cowl, I decided to offer it to my daughter as I still have all the hats and scarves that have featured on this blog and much as I love the cowl, I wasn’t sure if I really needed it.

However, I also had about half the yarn left and thought that it would be fun to make a hat to match the cowl. My daughter said that she would like a hat as well so I only hope her head is the same size as mine! 0553-hat

Now when I say match, I wasn’t going to use the same fair isle patterns as the cowl except for the rib. Google is always good for ideas and I copied out some of my favourites.

Traditional fair isle patterns normally have vertical or horizontal symmetry or both but some of the designs on the cowl only have rotational symmetry so I wanted to incorporate some of those. 0548-chart-for-cowlI am very fond of the Greek Key pattern so I included that early on for the hat.

Although I worked on the design on my computer, I copied it out onto squared paper to use a guide.0553-new-pattern

In the event I decided not to use both of the blue zig-zag on green parts of the design and replaced the second with a smaller purple on green section. (I didn’t use the last red and green part at all.)

Now what have I learned in the process of making this hat? Well a couple of things!

Firstly

If you are planning on making a hat it is much easier if you start with a pattern.

I started with the idea that the cowl although it slipped over the head easily was quite snug so the same number of stitches would be a good place to start. I did use a smaller 3.75 (UK 10) circular needle for the rib but it was not until I had got fairly far on and was wondering if now was the time to start decreasing that I thought a pattern might help to make sure I got it right.

So I spent hours trawling through fair isle hat patterns on Ravelry only to find a whole variety of needle sizes and tensions even for DK yarn and a wide range of stitch counts and increasing and decreasing. None of them that fitted in with what I was doing!

I found a decreasing look that I liked in the photographs which involved: skip two stitches, knit one, pass both slipped stitches over.

However I did not like the look so much when I had knitted it so it had to come out. I had also chosen six decreases a round and since it seemed best to have one of these decreases mid back where the row changed, I didn’t like the slight point at the front.

Now life was so busy last week that I didn’t feel up to taking a photograph so you will have to imagine.

So I undid back to before the decreasing (more on this in a moment) and tried again.

This time I chose seven decreases a round – easy as 19 x 7 is only one more than 132.

But then came the moment of truth. The hat was going to be too big! 😦 I was a bit unhappy that I had to remove the purple and green bit that I had thought of as leaves and a sort of parallel to the leaf pattern in the cowl but it had to be done! So using the same method I had used before I decided I would have to reduce the length by a couple of inches.

Here is a quick photograph I took with my phone at Crafty Coffee on Friday when I was just beginning to pull out those two inches. 0553-ready-to-undoSince the method I used is something that worked well. I thought I would mention it for anyone who finds it helpful.

This is the second thing I learned

Risk free way of undoing several rows without doing it stitch by stitch.

I heard (reading US blogs I think) of people putting in ‘life lines’ when they were knitting in case they needed to undo part of it later. I wasn’t sure what they were but it gave me an idea.

I took a needle and a piece of thin string and carefully went under the front part of every stitch on the row I wanted to go back to. (I chose a row where I was only using one colour.) I counted the stitches to make sure I had the right number then took a circular needle and threaded it through the same stitches and counted again. I then felt confident enough to remove the original circular needle. Finally I removed the string. In the photograph you can see how it looked just before I removed the string. I then undid the rows and sure enough when that was done all the stitches were neatly on the needle ready for me to start knitting again.

I added in a couple of rows in blue and then decreased after a red row. Originally I had thought I would just use two or more of the colours as stripes for the top but then I realised that I needed to continue the fair isle patterns to make the top as thick (and warm!) as the rest. 0553-top-of-hat

This time I decreased by a combination of K2tog through back loops and a normal K2tog.

And here are the hat and cowl together. 0553-hat-and-cowl

I still have about a quarter of the wool left but I don’t think it would be enough for mittens!

The cowl is fnished

I am pleased to announce that I managed to finish off the cowl this last week. 0549-finished-cowlI have to admit that I haven’t finished the ends and I haven’t ironed it but I wanted to show it to you today.

Just a bit better ironed. But really pleased with it!

0549-ironed-cowl

I have learned a lot!

When I continued the cowl after last week’s post, I did allow myself to not catch the yarn even when doing three stitches as  a way to speed up the knitting.

However when I got to about half way, I started to read advice on how to knit these two colour patterns and found that there were a lot of differences which was confusing but, reading what it said in the needlework encyclopedia I inherited for my mother, I did manage to start knitting with one lot of yarn held in the right hand and the other in the left, whereby the yarn on the right is thrown and the yarn on the left is picked up. It was more of a strain on my wrist but I even managed to work out how to catch the yarn for longer runs without leaving the yarn twisted. Here is the back. 0549-wrong-sideI find that there is more than half the wool left and so making a hat to match might be in order but this leaves me with a dilemma.

Next time I would like to try knitting more traditional fair isle patterns but they normally have reflective symmetry horizontally or vertically or both whereas the patterns in the cowl mostly have rotational symmetry so a hat done like that might look non-matching even if the colours were the same.

However I am going to have a break from knitting now and so plenty of time to think about it.

Fairisle cowl

I had hoped to have more of this to share with you but last Tuesday having planned an outing with my camera, I went down with the dreaded norovirus. They say one to three days, well I make it at least four! in my case. During this time all I wanted to do was rest with eyes gently closed, and, anyway, I didn’t want to risk contaminating my beautiful cowl.0548-one-third-of-cowlI found the cowl pattern on The Twisted Yarn’s blog HERE and absolutely loved it.

She used all sixteen shades of Stylecraft ‘batik’ yarn but I knew that doing the same would leave me with a lot of leftover yarn, so I calculated that four balls should be plenty. I was rather taken with the look of the ‘batik’.

So I went to a local yarn shop and chose my four favourite shades that I thought would work well together. (Teal, Raspberry, Violet, Sage)

Of course it wasn’t enough to just substitute colours for the sixteen in the original so I sat at my computer with my favourite drawing programme and played around with the colours till I produced a chart I could use. 0548-chart-for-cowlI found I had left one row out but luckily I discovered it! Can you see where? It’s the symmetry gives it away.

After earlier very poor attempts at fairisle type knitting I thought that this was a chance to master it, or at least to see if I could produce something acceptable. I think the batik effect of the yarn is fairly forgiving of irregularity.

I have been working very slowly and have found a way, laying each ball either side of me as I twist the yarn together, of not ending up with a tangle. I felt that my mother had twisted the yarn every stitch and that is what I have tried to do before but, as I can no longer ask my mother, I spoke to someone who said that she thought you only had to catch the yarn every two stitches so that is what I have done. 0548-my-fairisle-reverseHowever not up to my mother’s standard as you shall see below.

For those of you that like a story here is why I am so frustrated by my inability to knit fairisle and similar two colour knitting.

My mother knitted the most beautiful fairisle jumpers for my children 0548-mothers-knitted-jumperThis was my son’s favourite jumper for some years and as he loved it so much, when he grew out of it, my mother made him another in a larger size.

I had wanted to do the same for my grandchildren but all my attempts as this sort of knitting, large or small, have come out with a very irregular pulled look to them.

This morning I remember my mother’s knitting bag that I had inherited and how the lining is always coming adrift. So here is a photograph of the outside – 0548-mothers-fairisleand the reverse. 0548-mothers-fairisle-reverseIt does look as it she was twisting every stitch so I still have a long way to go to achieve that smooth, could almost have been made by a machine, look.

Since I think that the cowl does not look too pulled I will maybe leave mastering the every other stitch method for later.

Now to catch up on all the blogs I haven’t read over the last week!

Temperature scarf is now finished

About 1st or 2nd of January I finally finished the knitting of my temperature scarf and then all that was left was tying and cutting the ends. (No sewing in because they were to be inside. Yay!) sewing up the ends and adding some tassels.

So here it is! January starts at the end in the middle of the photograph and the orange stripe, top left, is the hottest day of the year in July when I went to Christchurch.0546-scarf-whole-yearYou may note that although I had a colour for below freezing (purple) and a few reds for hotter temperatures 0437-Temperature chartthat for 2016 the winters have been mild and the summer warm rather than hot. Other years we have had colder winters and hotter summers. However personally I like a more equitable climate.

It was so difficult to take a photograph of me wearing the scarf at home that when one of my Crafty Coffee friends wanted to take a photograph with her phone for the Facebook page I asked if I could have a copy.

Here is the first one where I was feeling anxious and had my hands over the scarf. 0546-wearing-scarf-in-focusas you can see.

And here is another. A much better photograph except that is a bit out of focus! 0546-wearing-scarfYou can see some of the people in the group sitting round the table in the background!

I am really, really pleased with it and because it is double thickness it is very warm and cosy and will stand up to cover my chin if I choose.

I also like the fact that it is longer than my other scarves and I love long tassels on a scarf.

A very Welcome Womble

This year I made two Christmas presents one of which was a womble. 0544-orinoco When my eldest was young the Wombles were on children’s television and my daughter’s favourite womble was Orinoco. She had a cuddly Orinoco which she loved and so when I was offered a knitting pattern to make a womble that was clearly Orinoco I said “Yes!” becuse I thought it would be fun to make it for her. 0544-womble-pattern(As you can see the pattern is a little worse for wear having been carried all over the place while knitting him.)

I decided to replace the white mohair of the pattern with eyelash yarn for greater authenticity. I have never knitted eyelash yarn before or the chenille needed for the face and hands but in the end it wasn’t as hard as I imagined and I could count the stitches which was important.

I am pleased to report that my daughter was really over the moon to receive him (even more than I had anticipated) so it all seemed very worth the effort, though I had regretted it a bit when it came to the sewing. (Never my favourite part.)

I also made a little blue bear for my granddaughter. 0544-little-bearI have a little blue bear that I made when pattern testing for another blogger which sits on my computer tower unit 0363-littlebearand I had asked my granddaughter whether she would like one ages ago but had never settled down to actually making one.

With Christmas on the horizon it seemed the ideal time.

I used the same wool as before because it needed aran weight and I generally use double knitting but still had a small ball of the blue aran.

However I decided to use a 2.5mm hook because I had one with a comfort handle in this size but not for 3mm which I think I used for the original. 0544-two-bearsYou can see that the latest bear came out a little smaller. But no bad thing and he apparently has joined the pocket pig 0033pigand a Christmas angel 0290-angelwithsashI had made previously!

 

Alpaca cowl

Having made a scarf for my daughter 0502-After ironingfrom some alpaca 4ply wool I had been given, I decided to use the rest to make a small cowl for myself.

Since I would be using circular needles and would be knitting it in many locations, I wanted a pattern that was such that

  1. It was less lacy than the scarf but still with holes.
  2. I didn’t need to look at the pattern
  3. or count rows.
  4. Whenever I put it down I would know where I was.

I couldn’t find anything that I liked that fulfilled the above so I wrote my own.

Rounds:

  1. Knit
  2. Repeat (Yarn over, knit two together) to end
  3. Knit
  4. Purl

Finishing on a 3rd row. Any even number of stitches. I chose 110.

I counted it as a bonus that the holes lined up in a diagonal fashion as that had been one thing I had thought of doing but couldn’t see a way to achieve it without an obvious changeover point.

Here it is finished. 0529-knitted-cowlI realised that although I have seen many cowls like this, that because it was so soft that it tended to fall down so I crocheted in some shir-elastic along the top to help hold it up under my chin.

I thought it would be handy to wear when I didn’t want the extra bulk of a scarf. 0529-cowl-worn

Couldn’t get the colours to look right though! The cowl is more crimson and the cost a deeper pink.

 

 

 

Summer time!

Just an update on my temperature scarf.

Sorry that the colours are not totally acurate. I don’t think digital cameras are worse than film cameras in this respect but I have great difficulty adjusting the photographs to get some colours correct.

This is June, July, August. 0522-june-to-augustNow some people have said to me that they don’t feel they have had a summer this year and I have to admit that June was disappointing as you could never be sure it wasn’t going to rain for pretty much the whole month but July and August were sunny and not too hot. ( I can’t stand too much heat these days.) This means that I never got to use any red as the highest temperatures were mainly a couple of hours after noon, and as I said it wasn’t as hot a summer as I feel we have had recently or in 1975 & 6.

You can see the orange stripe in July that was our mini heat-wave! (the day I went to Christchurch) and we had a hottish spell in late August too.

In recent years I have felt as if Autumn began in August: a nip in the air and the ‘autumn’ smell but not this year and even now it is not really cold in the middle of the day if the sun is out. (Not withstanding that coats and jumpers are needed.)

Here is June to September. You can see the blue coming back that indicates a drop in temperature. 0522-june-to-septemberCompare to March and April0487-March and AprilAnd January and February 0487-January and February

Birthday scarf

A while ago I was given two 50g balls of red alpaca 4ply wool by a friend as she didn’t have a use for it. What to make which that quantity? I decided that as alpaca is so soft and cuddly that I would make a scarf.

Now originally my plan had been to make it for myself but with someone’s birthday coming up, someone who’s colour is red I decided that it would be a birthday gift.

To give you an idea of the yarn here is what I have left. 0502-Free yarnI think this is enough to make a round the neck cowl for myself! which will keep it safe from the velcro on my coat!

I actually started the scarf a while ago and got about this far. 0502-First tryBut although I liked the rippled edge, I didn’t like the way it had developed an inverted ridge a few inches in. Obviously my bad knitting but I decided to put it aside for a while and maybe try again later.

After the garden had been done, having finished my cushion cover I returned to the scarf and decided to try another simpler pattern. Something easy as I was feeling rather tired.

And so I have been working on it for the last couple of weeks until it reached about 6ft (180cm).

Here it is just off the needles. 0502-Just off the needlesRather naively I had thought that as all the stitches were knit ones rather than purl (thinking garter stitch) that it would lie flat and have no right or wrong side!

Every other row was just knit and that seemed to create what looked like a right side. 0502-Right sideThe alternate rows consisted of yarn overs and k2togs which seemed to give more of a wrong side look. 0502-Wrong sideAnd the scarf tended to curl with the ‘right side’ on the outside!

I suppose there are those who would have blocked it but I was always taught to iron wool knitted items under a damp cloth which is what I did and produced this. 0502-After ironingNot that I think in wear that it will stay flat.

However I once had a very lovely emerald green long holey cottony scarf and that curled up but was none the worse for it.

Half way there!

Here is my Temperature Scarf from the beginning of  January to the end of June. Scarf half wayI used a rainbow/spectrum choice of colours from purple as coldest to red as hottest, so you can see we start at the left for January to June on the right. Unfortunately blue shades reproduce very badly on-screen.

Here is a reminder of my temperature colour chart. Temperature chartAnd here is a closer look at different months. January and FebruaryThis is January and February. The cotton represent where you change from one month to another. No below zero temperatures at mid-day but January is the only month where I had to use the darkest blue!

Then March and April. March and AprilYou can see how the paler blue shades start to become more prominent towards the end of March, Even a bright green = hotter day in the middle of April.

Now May and June. You can see how it is getting warmer.May and JuneThe wider band of pale green not long after the beginning of May represent a mini-heatwave. The sort I like when it is not too hot. We had another little heatwave early in June represent by the bright yellow. Unfortunately the bands of paler green towards the end of June could not be called a ‘heatwave’ as it is warmer now but we have had a lot of warm wet days! It seems to be mostly unpredictable showers and sunshine mixed.

Last week we were told that 28th June was the anniversary of the day in 1976 when the temperature in Southampton was 35.6 deg C ( about 96 def F) – the highest recorded temperature here ever apparently! I remember that summer well: lots of heat followed by thunderstorms. This summer though, the way it is going, I think I will be lucky to get as far as orange let alone red!