Kitchener stitch and Guess the Yarn

Quite a while ago when thinking about methods of knitting socks I came across Kitchener stitch but try as I might I couldn’t get my head round it and I found the instructions confusing.

Now quite often I imagine making things in my head that may never get made but are fun to think about and maybe this will be one of them.

But the other morning sitting up in bed I was thinking how wonderfully comfortable my bed jacket was. bed jacketand how it would be great to knit something similar to wear over jumper or t-shirt in the winter. At the same time I was thinking about how, having seen someone wearing a top with a zig-zag edge, I wanted to knit a jumper with a fancy edge. like in my gillet in this picture. (In pink on the left.)gillet on the left

Now you only get an edge like that if you knit bottom up but the jumper is top down and I love the way you get the raglan sleeve look and no seams. bed jacketSo it just might work if only I could do Kitchener stitch to join the zig-zag edge to the bottom of the jumper.

I sat examining the way the rows fitted together until I finally saw the way the yarn needed to go but then you have to do it.

So I decided to try to work out my own way of doing it.

It took a while but in the end I managed a small sample Kitchener stitch frontand I will explain my method in case anyone else finds it helpful.

Here is the other side. Kitchener stitch back

I knitted two small samples and had them on different needles and held them with the knit side at the front.

The thing that made it easy was that I had re-seated the stitches on the top needle so the left side of each loop was at the front instead of the back when looked at normally. I also re-seated the end stitch (nearest the point) on the other (lower) needle. This is very important for working the instructions below.

I threaded some yarn on a blunt needle and inserted the point under the front loop of the stitch at the end of the top needle.

Then I pulled the yarn through and pulled the stitch off the needle and threaded the yarn needle under the front of the first two loops on the lower needle.

I threaded the yarn through and pulled those stitches off the needle (sorry they are a bit out of focus!) and then moving to the upper needle threaded the yarn needle under the left hand side of the loop of the free stitch and under the front of the loop of the end stitch on the knitting needle.

Pulled the yarn through these and off the needle as for the lower stitches. Then for the lower knitting needle, I threaded the yarn needle under the left side of the free stitch below and under the loop at the front of the knitting needle.

I repeated this procedure, alternating between top and bottom all along.

As described below

I inserted the yarn on the blunt needle under the left hand side of the first stitch of the upper knitting needle that had been taken off and then under the right hand side of the front of the next next stitch. The stitch could then be safely slipped off the knitting needle and the yarn pulled through.

Similarly the yarn could then be put under the left hand side of the last stitch of the lower knitting needle that had been taken off and then under the front of the next stitch. The stitch could then be safely slipped off the knitting needle and the yarn pulled through.

Alternating between top and bottom it was easy to insert the yarn under the left hand side of the last removed stitch and the front loop of the adjacent stitch on the needle.

Which gave me. The tension of the added stitches could be adjusted afterwards. Maybe if I was practised this could be achieved perfectly as you went along.

It was quite hard to take the photographs but I hope they give you the general idea.

Now to Guess the Yarn

There are times at Crafty Coffee on Friday when people bring in yarn they no longer want. I have done it myself.

Last Friday someone brought in a lot of baby yarn and, although I have plenty of baby yarn from my recent knitting of baby coats, I was fascinated by the look of this yarn and so took the couple of balls that were there. unknown yarnThe trouble is, I am not sure whether it counts as 4-ply or double knitting and what it is made of.

I have had a look on the internet in various places but can’t find anything that looks like it.

Does anyone know who makes it and what it is called?

4 thoughts on “Kitchener stitch and Guess the Yarn

  1. I too thought it might be Sirdar as it looks like some Sirdar yarn that I found in my Mum’s stash – very old though. I looked up Sirdar yarns on the Wool Warehouse website, but could not see any like yours.
    Kitchener stitch looks a useful one to know about.
    Thank you for your tutorial – I will know where to come!

    Liked by 1 person

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